Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.

Competitors in Final Tapering for 30th Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon of 2008

Ironman Swim
By grayskullduggery

Competitors are now in tapering and making their final preparations for the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon event of 2008 to be held in Kona, Hawaiia on October 11 this coming Saturday.

Considered the biggest event in the Triathlon world, the course is famous for it’s grueling race conditions and length:

  • a 2.4 mile swim (3.84 km) followed by
  • a 112 mile (179.2 km) bike ride; and
  • 26.2 miles (42.2 km) – a standard marathon – to finish off

The event is also sponsored by Timex who acquired the name for their line of Timex Triathlon Ironman Watch models. As you may know we like Timex Triathlon Watches for many good reasons.

The origins of this famous event date back to an awards ceremony for a relay running race in Honolulu in 1977 when a debate was sparked among competitors over who is fitter – swimmers, runners or other athletes. One of the participants, Navy Commander John Collins and his wife Judy proposed merging three major existing events on the island: The Waikiki Roughwater Swim, the Around-Oahu Bike Race and the Honolulu Marathon to settle the debate. “Whoever finishes first we’ll call the “Ironman” proclaimed Collins.

Prior to racing, each athlete received three sheets of paper listing a few rules and a course description. Handwritten on the last page was this exhortation: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life”, now a registered trademark.

Of the fifteen men to start off in the early morning on February 18 1978, just twelve completed the race. Gordon Haller was the first “Ironman” completing the course in 11 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds. Lyn Lemaire, an elite cyclist from Boston placed sixth overall to become the first “Ironwoman”.

Ironman Cycle
Ironman Wisconsin, by Scott Klettke

As fate would go, Sports Illustrated journalist Barry McDermott was in the area to cover golf and caught wind of the event. He wrote a ten page article, exposing the Ironman event to hundreds of curious participants that also caught the attention of ABC’s Wide World of Sports who Collins gave permission to film the event. Collins had planned on changing the event to a relay race to attract more participants.

In 1981, new race director Valerie Silk made the decision to relocate the event from the shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kono on the Big Island of Hawaii to avoid Honolulu’s traffic hazards. The result of the relocation added a man-verses-nature element to the race – now a signature component.

The notoriety of the Ironman Triathlon would be cemented in February 1982, when Julie Moss, a college student competing to gather research for her exercise physiology thesis, found herself leading the women’s field. Suffering severe fatigue and dehydration, Julie was reduced to a stagger, collapsing several times, only meters from the finish line. Kathleen McCartney passed her for the title, but in one the most defining moments in sport, Moss, determined to finish crawled over the finishing line. Her effort and courage inspired millions and created the Ironman mantra that just finishing the event is an incredible achievement in itself and enough to earn you the title “Ironman”.


Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish. By btmonkey

Following Moss’s collapse, the event was moved from February to October providing athletes the opportunity train in more suitable summer climates to prepare for the event. This alteration resulted in two events for the 1982 year. The format has since remained unchanged.

The event is now so popular that to qualify you must either win a spot through a lottery system, or earn a spot as an elite competitor in one of the qualifying events around the world. Participants are limited to just 1,800 places.

These “lucky” and talented few will splash off on the shores of Kailua Bay from 6:45 a.m., this coming Saturday, October 11th.

Follow the link for more information on the 31st Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon Event of 2008.

Here is an incredible account of Julie Moss’s dramatic 1982 finish in her own words.

Prepare for your next Ironman with these Triathlon Wetsuits and be sure to choose one or more Timex Triathlon Watches of course.