For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply

For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training

A new report lead by the University of Sydney has shown that resistance training improves muscle strength and physical functioning while decreasing pain in many people with knee osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome in which low-grade inflammation results in pain in the joints, caused by abnormal wearing of the cartilage that acts as a cushion inside joints and also the decrease of synovial fluid that provides lubrication.

The disease affects nearly 21 million people in the United States and it is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 (though only 60% of those will be symptomatic).

Traditional treatment is with Non-Steroidal-Anti-Inflammatory-Drugs (NSAID’s), local injections of glucocorticoid or hyaluronan or in severe cases joint replacement surgery, however analysis of previously conducted trials has shown that resistance training – which included resistance machines, free weights, isometric exercise and other devices such as elastic bands – cause improvement of symptoms, physical function and strength.

More than half of the studies reported a decrease in pain and 79 percent found mobility improvement following the training.

Ironically a separate study has suggested recently that popular supplements Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate may be useless.

The study was published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more about it here.

3 Responses to “For Knee Arthritis, Try Resistance Training”

  1. two and a half men rocks Says:

    Every time i come here I am not dissapointed, nice post

  2. Cortaflex Says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more. And I’d like to add that you’ve got a great colour scheme on your site, I suffer with colour blindness and many webmasters don’t give us a second thought!

  3. Carmen Pucella Says:

    Awesome post here, you know, I never really given it much thought how topical it is to keep focused and top shape. There’s no difference if it’s for times of emergency and fitness will aid bring yourself and the other person through, or if it’s in common, everyday life when preparedness is important for general health and wellbeing. I say, exercise, do core training, and you’ll be ready for all. That’s for sure!

Leave a Reply