Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply

Report Shows Some Cereals the Nutritional Equivalent of a Doughnut in a Bowl

High Sugar Cereal
Photo courtesy of beketchai

For a long time, Cereal has been regarded a quick and healthy eating choice. But a new report has suggested that this is not universally true according to a references from an article on the sugar content on Kid’s cereals. New studies conducted by ConsumerReports.org have even revealed that some choices are the nutritional equivalent of a doughnut in a bowl.

In the report, 27 of the most heavily marketed to children breakfast cereals were evaluated for sugar content, sodium, fiber, calories and nutrients in a recommended serving. The major offenders are Post’s Golden Crisps and Kellogg’s Honey Smacks than deliver 50% sugar and very little dietary fiber. The 15 grams of sugar contained in a 3/4 cup serving of Honey Smacks has 3 more grams than is found in a Dunkin Donuts glazed doughnut!

Overall 11 of the tested cereals had 12 or more grams of sugar per serving, or the equivalent of a glazed doughnut. This is alarming when you consider parents often buy cereal believing it a healthy choice for their children. In actual fact many popular cereal brands contribute more to weight gain and obesity than providing adequate nutrients.

Four of the tested cereals were judged “Very Good” because of relatively low sugar and sodium, some fiber, high in iron and calcium. Medical Advisor Orly Avitzur, MD, reports that any of these cereals served with milk and a piece of fruit represents a good breakfast choice.

They are:

  • Cheerios (General Mills), with just 1 gram of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium
  • Kix (General Mills), with 3 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber, and 210 milligrams of sodium 
  • Life (Quaker Oats), with 6 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 160 milligrams of sodium
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (General Mills), with 9 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber, and 190 milligrams of sodium

And the Worst Rated Cereals…

  • Post’s Golden Crisp, 14 grams of sugar, 25mg sodium, 1 gram of fibre
  • Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 15 grams of sugar, 50mg sodium, 1 gram fibre
  • Cap’n Crunch’s Peanut Butter Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 9 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber and 200 mg of sodium
  • Cap’n Crunch (Quaker Oats), with 12 grams of sugar, 1 gram of fiber, and 200 milligrams of sodium
  • Apple Jacks (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Froot Loops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, less than 1 gram of fiber, and 135 milligrams of sodium
  • Corn Pops (Kellogg), with 12 grams of sugar, no fiber, and 110 milligrams of sodium in a 1 cup serving
  • Kellogg’s Rice Krispies 4 grams of sugar per serving high in sodium and had no fiber 0, 170mg of sodium

A spokeswoman from Kellogg responded to the report, by noting that the company has recently reformulated five of its cereals included in the Consumer Reports investigation to make them healthier choices.

While these reformulated cereals began to appear on grocery store shelves in June, Honey Smacks was a notable omission and according to Consumer Reports, even with the reformulation, the five cereals – Froot Loops, Corn Pops, Rice Krispies, Cocoa Krispies, and Apple Jacks – would still score poorly in a nutrition rating compared to other choices.

Consumer Reports nutrition Ratings are based on scores for energy density (the calorie concentration for the amount of food) and nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugars, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber. High dietary fiber is 5 grams or more per serving. A level of 1 teaspoon of sugar per serving was assigned for low sugar. Low sodium is considered to be 140 milligrams or less. All cereals were lowfat. The nutrition score reflects a balance between the amount of beneficial nutrients, such as fiber and calcium, and those that should be limited, such as sugar, sodium, and fat.

Read the full article here.

For a “dummies” guide to healthy nutritional requirements and how to get started losing those pounds, be sure to check out fat loss 4 idiots.

Leave a Reply