Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply

Vegan Diet Trumps ADA Recommendations

A Vegan Diet may reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics more than the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a new study has uncovered.

For 22 weeks, both men and women participants all with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat, low-glycemic vegan diet or the ADA guidelines.

Researches measured the participants Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) score at the beginning and end of the 22 week trial. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary index used to rate foods and macro-nutrients related to chronic disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At the end of the trial the vegan diet group significantly improved their AHEI score and in every AHEI category, whereas the ADA group did not, however neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D and E, or in calcium.

Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and cardiovascular disease.

The vegan diet involves increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy protein and cereal fiber and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Read the full story here.

Leave a Reply